References & Bibliography

He signed a will on 10 May 1759 in Staten Island, New York. From "Staten Island Wills and Letters of Administration, Richmond County, New York 1670-1800: As found in the Surrogate 's Court New York County, New York, Liber 22, page 345 and abstracted by The New York Historical Society, 1892-1908 and Staten Island references found in the New Jersey Colonial Documents, Pages 170, 171; Will of Jacob Vanderbilt of Staten Island:
In the name of God, Amen. "I, Jacob Vanderbilt, of Staten Island, Gent., being infirm and weak, do this 10 day of May, 1759, make this my last Will and Testament. All debts and funeral charges to be paid and satisfied. I leave to my wife Neeltie one of my negro women slaves, she is to have her choice, also a horse and chaise, and two good cows, and such part of my household goods as my said wife shall think fit, to choose and accept. I leave to my wife and two sons Jacobus and Cornelius, all my lands, messuges, and tenements on Staten I sland, or elsewhere, with all appurtenances and I make them executors. And at t he end of six months they are to sell at public venue all my lands and personal estate, and collect all debts due tome. From the proceeds I leave to my wife 3 00 pounds, also a bond of Dennis Vanderbilt for 300 pounds. All the rest I leav e to my children, Dennis, Hellitye, Jacobus, Helena, John, Cornelius, Anne, Phe be and Neeltie, except 1/10 which I give to my 5 fatherless grandchildren, the sons and daughters of my son Adrian, deceased, viz., Cornelia, Catharine, Jacob , John and Aris. I make my wife and my sons Jacobus and Cornelius executors.
Witnesses, Mary Corsen, Abraham Ann Smith, Daniel Corson Corsen. Proved, January 9, 1761.

Phebe Hand Vanderbilt  Continuity not change defined everything about her existence , an existence that differed little from that of her parents, grandparents or great-grandparents.  She sat in wooden furniture hand-cut from hand –hewn lumber.  She wore clothes hand-sewn from hand-spun wool.  She washed cup and plates that had been spun on a wheel, and bottles blown by a craftsman’s mouth.  Looking out a window, she would see hand-built wagons harnessed to teams of horses.  Peering a little farther, she could watch the sloops and ships that sailed by the shore just steps from her door.  And at night she would light the room with a mutton-fat candle or a whale-oil lamp.  Phebe lived in a close wooden world made by human hands, powered by winds and horse and human strength, clustered at the water’ edge.  Most of the technology she knew had been first imaged thousands of years before.  Even the newest inventions of her time—the clock, the printing press, the instruments of navigation—dated back the early Renaissance.  The “Brown Bess “ muskets stored in U.S. arsenal and carried by British redcoats had been designed in the 1690’s a full century before.    Revolution was a matter for politics; the constructed world merely crept ahead.

MINISTERS   Old Dutch Church NYC

 

17th Century

Samuel Drisius 1663 -1673 visiting minister

Voorlezers

Casparus Van Zuren 1678-1681 visiting minister

Voorlezers

Rev Petrus Tesschemacher 1683-1686

Voorlezer Henderyck Kroessen & visiting ministers

 

18th Century

Rev Cornelius Van Santvoord 1717-1742

Voorlezers

Rev. Peter DeWindt 1751-1752

Voorlezers

Rev. William Jackson 1753-1789

Rev Peter Stryker 1790-1794

Rev Thomas Kirby 1795-1801

 

19th Century

Rev Peter I. Van Pelt 1802-1835    

Rev. James Brownlee 1835-1895     

Alfred H. Demarest 1895-1901

 

20th Century

Rev. J. Frederic Berg 1902-1911

Rev Otto L. H. Mohn 1911-1928

Rev Frank S. Fry 1929 -1946    

Rev. Cornelius Vander Naald 1948-1958

Rev. Jack H. Hascup 1959-1967

Rev Fred W. Diekman 1968-1988

Rev. Debra L. Jameson 1989-1994

Rev Ian S. Todd 1996-1998

 

21st Century

Rev. Ruth Robbins 1999-2000

Voorlezer Dr. Warren A. Mac Kenzie 2001 to present

Commodore Vandarbilt and his Familyi p5

https://books.google.com/books?id=tEQmCTl-o9MC&pg=PA94&lpg=PA94&dq=jacob+vanderbilt+born+1723+on+staten+island&source=bl&ots=Ncpu_mCLrE&sig=llfxwvNy2aFcF3FDDJnNj51GvqM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjI-fSZioLXAhULxoMKHUJBAn8Q6AEISjAI#v=onepage&q=jacob%20vanderbilt%20born%201723%20on%20staten%20island&f=false

By 1665 our Reformed Protestant Dutch Church Congregants had nnnplanted the seeds

of the American Dream in the New World with their beliefs dating back to apostolic times: 

personal and religious liberty, and economic opportunity.

 

We are the oldest corporation on Staten Island, practicing its original purpose.

We have been on the same exact spot in Port Richmond since 1680.

The town of Port Richmond grew up around us, not the other way around.

Our Archives date to 1688.  Our Cemetery and Baptismal Records date to 1696.

 

In 1776 America's Founding Fathers embedded our beliefs into the Declaration of Independence as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

 

On Staten Island the American Revolution was a vicious civil war. 

Our Congregants fought for both sides.  Our Patriots played a major role in winning the war.

In 1783 our Patriot and Loyalist Congregants reconciled and set to work 

replacing our destroyed 1717 Church, and fashioning their new nation.

Our Congregant, Cornelius Vanderbilt, exploited these beliefs into a legendary fortune,

as he created our modern business world.

The First Tycoon  The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt  T.J. Stiles  Alfred A. Knopf  NY 2009

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

    

Warren Mac Kenzie, President

Mary Bullock, Vice President

Alan Gilkeson, Treasurer

Saul Porter, Secretary

Anna Porter

Archibald Edgar, Emeritus

/founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/03-24-02-0078-0002  last fort at Deckers Ferry

ECONOMIC DOWNTURN 1672 KILLED VERMEER

DUTCH VALUES EXPFRESSED IN HIS PAINITNG

Johannes Vermeer was baptized in the Reformed Church on 31 October 1632.

In 1672, a severe economic downturn (the "Year of Disaster") struck the Netherlands, after Louis XIV and a French army invaded the Dutch Republic from the south (known as the Franco-Dutch War). During the Third Anglo-Dutch War, an English fleet and two allied German bishops attacked the country from the east, causing more destruction. Many people panicked; courts, theaters, shops and schools were closed. Five years passed before circumstances improved. In 1674, Vermeer was listed as a member of the civic guards.[23] In the summer of 1675, Vermeer borrowed 1,000 guilders in Amsterdam from Jacob Romboutsz, an Amsterdam silk trader, using his mother-in-law's property as a surety.[24][25]

In December 1675, Vermeer died after a short illness. He was buried in the Protestant Old Church on 15 December 1675.[Note 9][Note 10] In a petition to her creditors, his wife later described his death as follows:

...during the ruinous war with France he not only was unable to sell any of his art but also, to his great detriment, was left sitting with the paintings of other masters that he was dealing in. As a result and owing to the great burden of his children having no means of his own, he lapsed into such decay and decadence, which he had so taken to heart that, as if he had fallen into a frenzy, in a day and a half he went from being healthy to being dead.[26]

Catharina Bolnes attributed her husband's death to the stress of financial pressures. The collapse of the art market damaged Vermeer's business as both a painter and an art dealer.

Land Papers June 13, 1688
The Dutch mark on America has been wide and deeper
than their small numbers and short formal hold on the land would seem to call for. 
                                                                                                                J. C. Furnas, The Americans:  A social history of the United States 1587-1914 p 75

Giovanni da Verrazzano Discovers

Staten Island, 1524

Photo courtesy of the Staten Island Borough President's Office/Michael Falco

Nine years before William's birth, in 1524, Giovanni Da Verrazzano visited Staten Island, coming ashore at "the watering hole" and interacting with the Lenape Indians.  

 

The Europeans would not make major contact until Henry Hudson in the seventeenth century.

Almost three centuries later it would become known as Tompkinsville, named for Daniel Tompkins, a member of our Old Dutch Church, who established a settlement there in 1815.

DRAFT:  Dec 16, 1773 Boston Tea Party.  The news of Boston was chaos, harbor blockades, british troops in the streets.  Then Lexington and Concord.  The idea of individual liberty germinating for centuries among the Waldenses and embedded in the New Amsterdam colony by Gov. Stuyvesant by his promotion fo the Dutch Reformed Church has been also for more than a century in England.  The many attacks upon the liberties of the English American Colonies  Several in Parliament colonies.By the summer of 1774 were defending the American Colonists.  One even called them "The Sons of Liberty" a name they readily adopted.  They believed that individual freedom was a real and tangible thing and England was fated to promote it.

Individual identity itself was being redefined:  To the Americans an individual had obligations to society and to the government, yes, but first and foremost an individual had rights.  The individual came first, and the state served him or her.  By the 1700s listening to the inner voice was part of the zeitgeist.  Novels, plays, even newspapers were alive with stories of people following their inner voices, listening to their feelings, believing they knew which way personal happiness and fulfilment lay, and believing they had a right to those things.

Through the 1600s and the 1700s there were attempts to found utopias based on democratic principles and redistribution of wealth. Those schemes mostly went nowhere,   Whereas in the Middle Ages the lower people were reduced to servitude . . . slaves fixed to the soil, in recent times people both in America and Europe had discovered "a natural inclination to liberty."

Vrijheid, in Dutch, freedom.  The various Dutch provinces had united into one nation in the Eighty Years War that ended in 1648.  The Dutch Republic was a new European nation, led not by a monarch but by a government with a rudimentary form of popular representation.  Might that be a precursor to what the Americans were about?

England's 1688 Glorious Revolution led to one monarch replacing another, but also to a newly strengthened Parliament and a bill of rights.

or call 1-718- 442-7393.  How can you help?  If you are able to donate, your gift will ensure that we can continue our history of worship, fellowship and service into the twenty-first century. If you are interested in our activities going forward please like our Facebook page: vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv or contact us to learn more.

Teaching with historic places

Sunday School addition ideally suited as a performance and rehearsal space.

Historic Preservation

Center for Genealogical Studies.  Walking and site tours.

Preservation Arts Technology:  gravestones, cemetery studies, stone restoratiohn, display production archival pres.

Columbarium  Here and in Charleston.

We hope this increases the strength of our congregation.

Van pelts school  ref Sources: J J Clute and

 From "Staten Island Journalism" by Ira K. Morris (and a book chapter with the same title) 1888 & 1898

By 1665 our Reformed Protestant Dutch Church Congregants had nnnplanted the seeds

of the American Dream in the New World with their beliefs dating back to apostolic times: 

personal and religious liberty, and economic opportunity.

 

We are the oldest corporation on Staten Island, practicing its original purpose.

We have been on the same exact spot in Port Richmond since 1680.

The town of Port Richmond grew up around us, not the other way around.

Our Archives date to 1688.  Our Cemetery and Baptismal Records date to 1696.

 

In 1776 America's Founding Fathers embedded our beliefs into the Declaration of Independence as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

 

On Staten Island the American Revolution was a vicious civil war. 

Our Congregants fought for both sides.  Our Patriots played a major role in winning the war.

In 1783 our Patriot and Loyalist Congregants reconciled and set to work 

replacing our destroyed 1717 Church, and fashioning their new nation.

Our Congregant, Cornelius Vanderbilt, exploited these beliefs into a legendary fortune,

as he created our modern business world.

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