Port Richmond Today

To 21st 

Century 1

Retaining its pre-mall atmosphere, Port Richmond Avenue may be the premiere neighborhood walking street on Staten Island.  A tapestry woven of immigration provides a rich experience and guides us to opportunities for community and growth.  Best of all, there is a sense of place. 

 

The first residents were Dutch, French, Belgian, and African; they probably did not even speak English. Our own Rev. William Jackson preached in Dutch until 1783.  Then in the 1700s came the English, followed by:  1800s Irish, German, Polish, Scandinavian.    1920s Greek.    1960s Cuban.    1990s Filipino, Mexican, Syrian.  Today the breakdown is approximately 27% White, 21% Black, >45% Hispanic, <4% Asian, <4% Other

In 2008 Voorlezer, Dr. Warren A. Mac Kenzie,

and the Congregation

Landmarked the 1844 Church and 1898 Sunday School Annex

a well as the 1696 Burial Place

and listed them on the National Register of Historic Places.

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There are four other landmarked sites

within easy walking distance of our old Dutch Church. 

P.S. 20 Annex  now Senior Housing

160 Heberton Avenue

29 Cottage Place

Carnegie NYP Library  75 Bennett Street

121 Heberton Avenue

Village Charm

A dramatic business slump, and building booms in Staten Island’s western and southern areas

that largely excluded Port Richmond, have allowed it to retain much of its original village charm.  

Heberton Avenue has hidden gems of preserved late 19th century architecture.  

Veteran's Park

Veterans Park, the town green between Park and Heberton Avenues and Bennett Street, is Staten Island’s oldest park. It was laid out in 1836 as the village green when the streets were mapped.  In 1898, the year of New York City’s consolidation, it was named Port Richmond Park.

Unique properties around Port Richmond Avenue give a sense of place as you stroll.

End 21st

Century

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